Pagina 81 van de 116 EersteEerste ... 3171798081828391 ... LaatsteLaatste
Resultaten 801 tot 810 van de 1153

Onderwerp: Buitenlandse politiek

  1. #801
    En nog een voor JMD.

    The intellectual dishonesty of the Brexit Taliban is now in full view
    By Carl Bildt
    July 9
    1:19
    British lawmakers laugh as May addresses Boris Johnson's resignation
    Shortly after British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson resigned on July 9, Prime Minister Theresa May addressed Johnson's resignation in the House of Commons. (Reuters)

    The United Kingdom is crashing into the fundamental intellectual dishonesty of its brave Brexit campaigners: No one on the pro-Brexit side had the courage or the competence to explain alternatives to membership in the European Union.

    Now, after the resignations of lead Brexit Secretary David Davis and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, the UK’s political system is degenerating into a furious fistfight between advocates of different bad options. It’s ugly, and it’s likely to get worse.

    More than two years have passed since the referendum, but Davis had not spent more than four hours in trying to negotiate with his E.U. counterpart Michel Barnier. And the clock is ticking: The UK is supposed to leave the E.U. by March 2019; there has to be an agreement on the exit terms and the transition period before October.


    Brexit negotiations haven’t made any progress because the UK government has spent more time negotiating with itself rather than Brussels, which has simply had to wait for London to sort itself out.

    Prime Minister Theresa May was supposed to bridge the divides in her cabinet, get some sort of realistic strategy on paper and get on with the key task of negotiating with Brussels. Initially, it looked as if the prime minister had managed to get everyone aboard for a shotgun agreement on some sort of policy. It didn’t last long. Now everything risks going up in flames.

    May has tried to combine the rhetoric of “hard Brexit” with policies of a “soft Brexit,” which would have been difficult even under the best of circumstances. The resigning Brexiteers are not wrong in pointing out some of the flaws in the proposed deal. It tries to square a circle, which historically has always been tricky. Not being in the single market, but seeking to be for the sake of goods, was bound to be a tricky position both in terms of domestic public opinion and in the relationship with the remaining E.U. countries.


    Are there options? A Norwegian-style model with a membership of the single market is technically possible, but it does include a painful democratic deficit that would be hard to swallow. Norway is a member of the E.U. single market and accordingly has to abide by all the rules that define this market, ranging from the minutiae to the massively important. But it’s the E.U. member states that decide the rules on the single market that Norway must follow. In fact, May seems to be seeking a semi-Norway solution for UK goods. But the E.U. is likely to want to go full-Norway.

    Many industries have made clear that these economic issues are fundamental issues for them — Airbus is only the latest company that has started to speak up. Car companies are in the UK to produce not only for the UK, but also for the entire E.U. market; others are dependent on tightly integrated value chains with thousands of suppliers spread across the E.U. If their integrated market or production bases are suddenly fractured with tariffs, rules-of-origin procedures and unforeseen costs, it simply doesn’t work anymore. The world is a very competitive place, and deteriorating competitiveness due to new barriers and costs has a high price.

    This is what has driven May toward her new approach. But not only does it clash with her “red-line” rhetoric, it also has infuriated the Brexit Taliban and is unlikely to fly with the remaining 27 E.U. countries.


    So where is all this heading? The London betting firms might be as good — or as bad — in predicting what will happen as the political pundits and observers. It’s a profound mess — but there the agreement ends.

    The worst possible outcome would be a UK that simply crashes out of the E.U. without an agreement. I still believe and hope that sanity will prevail and prevent this, but with the current turmoil, nothing can be excluded.

    The entire Brexit process has demonstrated how integrated the E.U. economies and societies have become during their decades together and how intrusive in many different areas the divorce process really is — from nuclear safety to the possibility to travel across Europe with your favorite pets. To disentangle — say California or Texas — from the United States might only be marginally more difficult.

    The United Kingdom has to choose between different bad options, and that is never a comfortable situation to be in. The UK’s government will be able to chart a course out of it only when it wakes up to the unpleasant realities of its predicament.

    But we are not there yet.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.f7e2606073af

    Geen goed teken als de Washingtonpost je aanvalt.

  2. #802
    Thanks

    Vraag me af wat er gebeurt als er geen overeenkomst is in maart 2019 over hoe ze de Brexit gaan regelen. Wat gebeurt er dan?

  3. #803
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door Atreides Bekijk Berichten
    May has tried to combine the rhetoric of “hard Brexit” with policies of a “soft Brexit,” which would have been difficult even under the best of circumstances. The resigning Brexiteers are not wrong in pointing out some of the flaws in the proposed deal. It tries to square a circle, which historically has always been tricky. Not being in the single market, but seeking to be for the sake of goods, was bound to be a tricky position both in terms of domestic public opinion and in the relationship with the remaining E.U. countries.
    Altijd mooi om in een artikel een wiskundig probleem te zien, 'de kwadratuur van de cirkel, 1 van de 3 klassieke problemen.' Die bleken onmogelijk, het is te hopen voor het VK dat dit wel mogelijk is.

    Overigens wat anders: hoe kan het dat zo'n overeenkomst die Noorwegen heeft met de EU wel voor de Noren werkt (want die zijn daar toch niet slechter van geworden) en niet voor de Britten zou werken?

  4. #804
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door JMD Bekijk Berichten
    Thanks

    Vraag me af wat er gebeurt als er geen overeenkomst is in maart 2019 over hoe ze de Brexit gaan regelen. Wat gebeurt er dan?
    Liggen ze uit de EU en wordt er gehandeld als een third country op WTO-niveau.

    Mogen de vliegtuigen niet meer het luchtruim verlaten, staan er rijen bij de grenzen, hebben ze waarschijnlijk een tekort aan voedsel binnen een maand of wat. Maar de lijst aan problemen is bijna oneindig.

    Ook wel aardig, er is een schending van het goede vrijdag akkoord met o.a. de IRA ergo een constitutionele overtreding van de regering aangezien de Ierse grens open moet zijn...

  5. #805
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door JMD Bekijk Berichten
    Altijd mooi om in een artikel een wiskundig probleem te zien, 'de kwadratuur van de cirkel, 1 van de 3 klassieke problemen.' Die bleken onmogelijk, het is te hopen voor het VK dat dit wel mogelijk is.
    ?
    Haha. Zo las ik hem niet. Wist ik overigens ook niet (meer?).


    Overigens wat anders: hoe kan het dat zo'n overeenkomst die Noorwegen heeft met de EU wel voor de Noren werkt (want die zijn daar toch niet slechter van geworden) en niet voor de Britten zou werken
    Het zou wel werken voor de Britten (als is het nog steeds minder dan wat ze nu hebben). Maar als je wel betaald voor de EU en wel de regels moet volgen, maar geen zeggenschap hebt waarom zou je dan vertrekken?

    Kon nog wel eens amusant worden:

    https://twitter.com/davidallengreen/...35212618752001
    https://twitter.com/davidallengreen/...38040686940161

  6. #806
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door Atreides Bekijk Berichten
    Liggen ze uit de EU en wordt er gehandeld als een third country op WTO-niveau.
    Mogen de vliegtuigen niet meer het luchtruim verlaten, staan er rijen bij de grenzen, hebben ze waarschijnlijk een tekort aan voedsel binnen een maand of wat. Maar de lijst aan problemen is bijna oneindig.
    Waarom mag een vliegtuig dan het luchtruim niet verlaten? Dat is toch niet afhankelijk van de EU?
    En rijen bij de grenzen? VK is geen Schengenland, dus we staan toch sowieso al in de rij? Of gaat men vanuit de EU dan een visum eisen?
    En waarom direct een 3rd country op WTO-niveau? Zo werden ze toch ook niet behandeld voordat ze in de zeventiger jaren toetraden tot de EU?

  7. #807
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door Atreides Bekijk Berichten
    Het zou wel werken voor de Britten (als is het nog steeds minder dan wat ze nu hebben). Maar als je wel betaald voor de EU en wel de regels moet volgen, maar geen zeggenschap hebt waarom zou je dan vertrekken?
    Maar de Noren betalen er ook voor toch? Die zijn er wel blij mee.

  8. #808
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door JMD Bekijk Berichten
    Maar de Noren betalen er ook voor toch? Die zijn er wel blij mee.
    De Noren betalen ook. En de Britten zouden ook blij moeten zijn met de huidige regeling. Maar dat zijn ze niet omdat ze al jarenlang bananenverhalen horen en denken dat de bijdrage aan de EU zinloos is.

    Als de politici eerlijk zouden zijn hadden ze aangegeven dat de EU zichzelf ruimschoots terugverdient. Beetje op het niveau van een onderwijzer als kostenpost zien en niet begrijpen dat het opleiden van kinderen wel eens nuttig kan zijn.

  9. #809
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door JMD Bekijk Berichten
    Waarom mag een vliegtuig dan het luchtruim niet verlaten? Dat is toch niet afhankelijk van de EU?
    Technisch gezien van de verdragen met de omringende landen. In dit geval de EU landen die alleen via de EU handelen.


    En rijen bij de grenzen? VK is geen Schengenland, dus we staan toch sowieso al in de rij? Of gaat men vanuit de EU dan een visum eisen?
    We hebben nu nog één markt en een versnelde toelatingsprocedure. Denk nu maar aan dagen in de rij gaan staan (bij het huidige gebrek aan douaniers).

    En waarom direct een 3rd country op WTO-niveau? Zo werden ze toch ook niet behandeld voordat ze in de zeventiger jaren toetraden tot de EU?
    Klopt. Toen hadden ze verdragen met de EU die dat afdekten. Vergelijk het met een scheiding. Alle oude afspraken vervallen en je gaat terug naar de standaard juridische verhouding met een derde persoon. TENZIJ je anders afspreekt.

  10. #810
    Citaat Oorspronkelijk geplaatst door Atreides Bekijk Berichten
    Technisch gezien van de verdragen met de omringende landen. In dit geval de EU landen die alleen via de EU handelen.
    Maar dan kunnen vluchten naar het westen (oke, dan over NI vliegen) toch wel 'normaal' doorgaan?
    En even over je vb verder: Egypte grenst aan een EU-land (Griekenland), die vliegtuigen kunnen toch wel gewoon vliegen. Wat heeft Egypte dan wel wat de VK niet heeft?

    Overigens kan ik me niet voorstellen dat (zelfs als er geen afspraken zijn) dit soort dingen zo gaan lopen: de EU landen/inwoners willen ook nog het VK, en die willen ook niet uren in de rij staan om het VK in te mogen.

Forum Rechten

  • Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
  • Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
  • Je mag geen bijlagen toevoegen
  • Je mag jouw berichten niet wijzigen
  •